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World's 50 Best Restaurants

Malabar: Private dinner demo by Chef Schiaffino in Lima, Peru

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Malabar: Private dinner demo by Chef Schiaffino in Lima, Peru

“There are naked ladies in there!” gasped a member of our tour group. We had arrived before the restaurant opened, and she was peeking through a tiny gap in the door at Malabar, the third of four top-rated restaurants on Bold Food’s culinary tour of Lima.

People come to Malabar to eat world-class Peruvian food, but their first impression of the restaurant may be the portrait of two nude swimmers by Colombian artist Heriberto Cogollo at the entrance. It’s just one of a collection of Latin American and Peruvian art throughout the restaurant.

Our group chatted amiably and admired the artwork as we sipped perfectly balanced el capitan cocktails before heading up to Taller Malabar. The Taller, or workshop, is a space over the kitchen that serves as a private demo space where we would have the incredible honor of having Chef Pedro Miguel Schiaffino cook for us. (Some people may remember Chef Schiaffino from Anthony Bourdain’s 2013 visit to Peru on “Parts Unknown.”) Chef Schiaffino hosts his own TV show in Peru called “From the Garden”, and our amazing local guide, Vanessa Vazquez, was quite star struck.

Malabar specializes in using Peruvian ingredients, both from its own farm and sourced directly from local producers. The restaurant also has it own fermentation program. Chef Schiaffino’s second restaurant, Amaz, specializes in Amazonian ingredients and dishes. He is the first chef in Lima to focus on dishes from the Amazon, and the reception has been very positive.

As soon as we were seated at our demo table, Chef Schiaffino began preparing the first dish: peeled hearts of palm with toasted yucca, nuts and nut oils. The chef told us about the ingredients, showed us what palm looked like in its raw form and described how everything was made. This was the third night of the Lima tour, and we had already enjoyed extensive tasting menus at Maido and Central—two of the most critically acclaimed restaurants in South America--so we were happy when the chef told us that he would be preparing light, simple fare.

The second dish, a combination of luscious Peruvian avocado, asparagus and aji negro, was my favorite. Aji negro is fermented yucca juice, which I think of as Peruvian soy sauce. It’s a bit salty and full of rich umami flavors. We can’t get fermented yucca in the U.S. yet, but I’m hoping that will change soon. Peru is the world’s largest exporter of asparagus, and we were lucky enough to eat the first-ever asparagus crop from Malabar’s farm.

The avocado dish was followed by a corn tostada made with a corn crisp and corn sprouts, then by an incredible stewed fish dish with house-made corn beer known as chicha, then by crispy guinea pig with house-made kimchi, and, finally, by local duck with roasted pumpkin and cilantro rice. Dessert was cherimoya sorbet with meringue, toasted red quinoa, and dried oca chips. Oca is a native Andean tuber that is packed with carbohydrates and becomes a bit sweet when dried.

Throughout the dinner, Chef Schiaffino was eager to address our questions, and he even revised the menu to incorporate ingredients in which we showed interest.

Of all of our amazing dinners in Lima, Malabar’s was the one where we learned the most about Peruvian ingredients and preparations. Chef Schiaffino is passionate about his food and about his native cuisine. Having him at our table, showing us his artistry and answering all of our questions, was priceless. I have been to Malabar multiple times now, and the food has been exceptional each time.

It seems fitting that our first impression of the artwork and our last impression of Chef Schiaffino and the food at Malabar were equally as inspiring.

If you want to join us for our next culinary vacation to Peru, we will be returning to Lima in 2018 from Jan 31 to Feb 4, and July 18 to 22.

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Noma: The Nordic Food Revolution

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Noma: The Nordic Food Revolution

If you’ve eaten at a restaurant anywhere in the world in the last 10 years and been offered something foraged, something smoked in hay or moss, or something flavored with hearty greens or pine, it's because of Noma—a two-Michelin-star restaurant in Copenhagen, Denmark.  

If you've eaten at a vegetable-forward restaurant or eaten something that is usually thrown away (like the fish head below), it's because of Noma.

If you've eaten at a restaurant where everything on the menu comes from less than 100 miles away and is likely fermented, it's because of Noma.

If you've been to a restaurant that's been influenced by or is a part of the Nordic movement, it's because of Noma.

Under the direction of chef and owner René Redzepi, Noma has arguably had the biggest impact on the world of food in the last decade.

I ate at Noma in February 2014 with my friend Jen, who is incredibly knowledgeable about the restaurant world. At the time, Jen was only was acquaintance. A mutual friend told Jen that I was the kind of crazy, obsessive foodie who would trek halfway around the world with her to spend the weekend in Copenhagen to eat at Noma. After a jam-packed food itinerary that included meals at Geranium, Relæ, Radio, a castle, and a bunch of smørrebrød, we were great friends. Poorer friends, but great friends. 

While the farm-to-table philosophy seems very Bay Area, it’s Noma that started the hyper local food trend. Chef Redzepi actually employs the extreme constraints of using only Danish, and sometimes Nordic, ingredients to push the creativity of the restaurant. He has a specific theory that extreme constraints drive creativity. In the 2013 recipe and journal collection René Redzepi: A Work in Progress, he spends a year keeping a journal focused on the restaurant, pushing himself and his staff to be more creative and trying to stay sane and centered through the pressures of being the #1 restaurant in the world for four years in a row. It's a fascinating window into obsessive creativity, and I came away from both this journal and my meal at Noma thinking that this level of perfection and creativity requires a certain level of madness. In the right profession (a chef, a sculptor, an architect, etc.) and a sufficiently high level of notoriety, madness is also known as genius.

Was Noma my favorite meal ever? No. Athough it's certainly in the top 10 (and it’s a great top 10 list). The main reason may be that it was winter in Denmark. The only non-Nordic items used at Noma are chocolate,wine and coffee, and they are used sparingly. That means that most of what’s served in February are hearty greens, root vegetables, preserved items, fish and game. For such a vegetable-forward restaurant, that means that the palate of the meal is tarter and more bitter than I prefer. Nonetheless, I was blown away by the meal .

My favorite courses were the fish head, caramelized milk and monk fish liver, urchin toast, and caramelized bread. The fish head was served on the stick that is used to grill it, with no other utensils. It is covered in an incredibly savory seaweed-based wet rub, and Jen and I used our hands to eat it. I ate the eyeball, too. I was glad I did because tasted great—like a rush of the best savory broth. But cultural norms die hard, and I almost gagged. The caramelized milk and monkfish liver was brilliant. Dairy is plentiful in Denmark, and Noma finds many different uses for milk. In this case, milk is slowly caramelized until is becomes a solid, and it is used as a cracker base for the dish. Monkfish liver is like the foie gras of the sea, so the dish was rich, savory and meaty. The urchin was served on a small piece of charred bread, and it was covered by a duck "skin." A rich duck broth is cooked until a thick skin of protein forms on the surface, which is then removed and dried. It tastes like the best parts of duck, but unimaginably concentrated. I would never have thought to combine urchin and duck, but it was brilliant. 

The wines were natural, often orange—and funkier than I had ever tasted before. The juice pairing was a collection of vegetable and fruit juices, often fermented and always refreshing. At least 80% of the menu was either something I had never eaten before, or never prepared in that way before. 

Noma is currently closed, with the intention of opening again sometime this year. Their new space will be a farm within the city, allowing them more space to grow their own ingredients and enough space to house their extensive research and development activities. Noma has done a series of pop-ups in Japan, Australia and Mexico, and all of them have received rave reviews. It's hard to imagine that they can continue to grow and push the boundaries of creativity, but I have no doubt that they will. If I have the chance to go again, I certainly will. Hopefully in August this time.

 

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Maido in Lima, Peru: The best of Nikkei, the fusion of Peruvian and Japanese food

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Maido in Lima, Peru: The best of Nikkei, the fusion of Peruvian and Japanese food

Recommended: Strongly        

Type of Food: High end, Technique driven, Creative, Modernist, Local Ingredients

Maido is ranked 13 on the World's 50 Best Restaurants list and is ranked 5 on Latin America's 50 Best Restaurants list.  Maido was my favorite meal in Lima.  At it's heart, Peruvian food is a fusion cuisine based on all of the immigrants who have added their flavors to the indigenous culture including Japanese, Chinese, Italian, African and Spanish.  Nikkei is Japanese-Peruvian food.  When I first heard about Nikkei, I was skeptical.  When I tasted it, I was an immediate convert.  The great umami centered Japanese cuisine combined with Peruvian ingredients with it's acid and incredible fruit and vegetable diversity makes for one of the most flavorful and exciting cuisines in the world.  No doubt.  The vibe at Maido is relaxed, and it is large enough that there are a small number of walk ins available.  However, reservations are a must if you want the Amazon Nikkei Experience, which is their tasting menu.  I have heard that if you are not able to get a reservation for the Nikkei Experience, they may be able to provide a smaller tasting menu experience.  Mitsuharu Tsumura is the chef and owner of Maido.  He is a native of Lima and trained in Japan before opening Maido.  If you are in Lima, make sure to get a reservation at Maido for the Nikkei Experience.  

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Central in Lima, Peru: The best restaurant in a great food city

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Central in Lima, Peru: The best restaurant in a great food city

Recommended: Strongly        

Type of Food: High end, Technique driven, Creative, Modernist, Local Ingredients

Central is currently ranked #4 on the World's 50 Best Restaurant's List and #1 on the Latin America's 50 Best Restaurant's List.  They are known for venturing into the wilds of Peru to find native ingredients to highlight in the restaurant.  Peru is one of the world's most ecologically diverse countries containing peaks in the Andes that are over 20,000 feet high, jungles along the Amazon river, and a coastal desert where most of the population lives.  There are 4,000 varieties of potatoes, hundreds of varieties of chili peppers, and jungle fruit I had never seen before.  Central's mission is to highlight the amazing diversity and uniqueness of Peru's flora and fauna and they do it incredibly well.  The cost of the large 18 course tasting menu is 398 Peruvian Nuevos Soles which is about $120.  This is a lot of money in Peru, but much less than most world class restaurants cost.  Central succeeds in presenting a very refined version of incredible Peruvian cuisine.  

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