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Malabar: Private dinner demo by Chef Schiaffino in Lima, Peru

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Malabar: Private dinner demo by Chef Schiaffino in Lima, Peru

“There are naked ladies in there!” gasped a member of our tour group. We had arrived before the restaurant opened, and she was peeking through a tiny gap in the door at Malabar, the third of four top-rated restaurants on Bold Food’s culinary tour of Lima.

People come to Malabar to eat world-class Peruvian food, but their first impression of the restaurant may be the portrait of two nude swimmers by Colombian artist Heriberto Cogollo at the entrance. It’s just one of a collection of Latin American and Peruvian art throughout the restaurant.

Our group chatted amiably and admired the artwork as we sipped perfectly balanced el capitan cocktails before heading up to Taller Malabar. The Taller, or workshop, is a space over the kitchen that serves as a private demo space where we would have the incredible honor of having Chef Pedro Miguel Schiaffino cook for us. (Some people may remember Chef Schiaffino from Anthony Bourdain’s 2013 visit to Peru on “Parts Unknown.”) Chef Schiaffino hosts his own TV show in Peru called “From the Garden”, and our amazing local guide, Vanessa Vazquez, was quite star struck.

Malabar specializes in using Peruvian ingredients, both from its own farm and sourced directly from local producers. The restaurant also has it own fermentation program. Chef Schiaffino’s second restaurant, Amaz, specializes in Amazonian ingredients and dishes. He is the first chef in Lima to focus on dishes from the Amazon, and the reception has been very positive.

As soon as we were seated at our demo table, Chef Schiaffino began preparing the first dish: peeled hearts of palm with toasted yucca, nuts and nut oils. The chef told us about the ingredients, showed us what palm looked like in its raw form and described how everything was made. This was the third night of the Lima tour, and we had already enjoyed extensive tasting menus at Maido and Central—two of the most critically acclaimed restaurants in South America--so we were happy when the chef told us that he would be preparing light, simple fare.

The second dish, a combination of luscious Peruvian avocado, asparagus and aji negro, was my favorite. Aji negro is fermented yucca juice, which I think of as Peruvian soy sauce. It’s a bit salty and full of rich umami flavors. We can’t get fermented yucca in the U.S. yet, but I’m hoping that will change soon. Peru is the world’s largest exporter of asparagus, and we were lucky enough to eat the first-ever asparagus crop from Malabar’s farm.

The avocado dish was followed by a corn tostada made with a corn crisp and corn sprouts, then by an incredible stewed fish dish with house-made corn beer known as chicha, then by crispy guinea pig with house-made kimchi, and, finally, by local duck with roasted pumpkin and cilantro rice. Dessert was cherimoya sorbet with meringue, toasted red quinoa, and dried oca chips. Oca is a native Andean tuber that is packed with carbohydrates and becomes a bit sweet when dried.

Throughout the dinner, Chef Schiaffino was eager to address our questions, and he even revised the menu to incorporate ingredients in which we showed interest.

Of all of our amazing dinners in Lima, Malabar’s was the one where we learned the most about Peruvian ingredients and preparations. Chef Schiaffino is passionate about his food and about his native cuisine. Having him at our table, showing us his artistry and answering all of our questions, was priceless. I have been to Malabar multiple times now, and the food has been exceptional each time.

It seems fitting that our first impression of the artwork and our last impression of Chef Schiaffino and the food at Malabar were equally as inspiring.

If you want to join us for our next culinary vacation to Peru, we will be returning to Lima in 2018 from Jan 31 to Feb 4, and July 18 to 22.

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Food Trends 2017: What's on the Way

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Food Trends 2017: What's on the Way

As an obsessive foodie and avid traveler, I have the opportunity to eat at a wide variety of restaurants around the world. That puts me in a good position to spot emerging food trends. 

One current food trend I hope will go away soon is pine. Every restaurant of a certain creativity level has a dish flavored with pine right now. Yep, that's Christmas tree flavor. We can thank Noma and the Nordic food revolution for this addition to the global food lexicon. A lot of amazing things have come out of the Nordic movement, but pine is not one them. When I ate at Noma, Geranium, Radio and Relæ in Copenhagen in 2014, I had a LOT of pine. (If Rene Redzepi were here now, I'd have a very creative way to thank him for the pine in my food!)

Below are some food trends that I expect to gain popularity in the next few years. Feel free to share your own predictions in the comments section below.


Koji

SingleThread  in Healdsburg, CA - Mt. Lassen trout ibushi-gin with shio koji vinaigrette, trout roe, and myoga

SingleThread in Healdsburg, CA - Mt. Lassen trout ibushi-gin with shio koji vinaigrette, trout roe, and myoga

Koji is the fungus used to make soy sauce, miso and sake, and shio koji is a salted liquid that is used as a marinade and sauce which contains enzymes that help break down proteins which releases free glutamate, the main source of umami. Koji preparations are clearly well known in Japan, but koji has been on the menu at SingleThread in Sonoma, Baroo in Los Angeles, Barley Swine in Austin, The Restaurant at Meadowood in Napa, and Restaurant Andre in Singapore.

Barroo  in Los Angeles, CA - Farro and kamut cooked with koji beet creme and dashi with nuts and rose apple pickle.

Barroo in Los Angeles, CA - Farro and kamut cooked with koji beet creme and dashi with nuts and rose apple pickle.


Raw Fish

Gaggan  in Bangkok, Thailand - Raw fish taco

Gaggan in Bangkok, Thailand - Raw fish taco

Raw fish preparations are a part of many cultures, but we are not simply seeing them in expected places like Japan (sushi), Mexico and Peru (ceviche). We are seeing raw fish in Hawaiian poke-like preparations in fast casual restaurants, and a raw lobster preparation at Bianchi in Zurich. There were recently two raw fish dishes on the menu at Gaggan, a high end modernist Indian food restaurant in Bangkok, and just about every chef driven restaurant in the US will have a crudo or ceviche like dish on the menu.


Edible Clay and Dirt

Central  in Lima, Peru - Cushuro (a round colony of bacteria from the Andes that are solid but chewy), cacao, chaco clay.  

Central in Lima, Peru - Cushuro (a round colony of bacteria from the Andes that are solid but chewy), cacao, chaco clay.  

Noma in Copenhagen has served dirt to their guests (on purpose), and for years Michel Bras has garnished his famous gargouillou salad with a bit of dirt. Andean natives in Peru eat the clay that sticks to the potatoes they cook in the earth, and Central and other restaurants in Peru have started serving edible clay. Central actually serves a dessert with edible clay and white chocolate.  As Peru is driving many culinary trends right now, the edible clay trend will continue to grow.

 

 


Non-alcoholic Drinks and Pairings

SingleThread in Healdsburg, CA - Turmeric and grenadine with smoked salt

SingleThread in Healdsburg, CA - Turmeric and grenadine with smoked salt

Many high end restaurants are putting more effort than ever into beverage pairings that do not contain alcohol. SingleThread in Sonoma County offers a revelatory non-alcoholic pairing. Coi in San Francisco offers a tea pairing, and Restaurant Andre in Singapore is fermenting their own juices. The trend is also starting to trickle into more casual chef driven restaurants and will continue to do so.

 

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Single Thread: Soon to be a Michelin 3 star restaurant

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Single Thread: Soon to be a Michelin 3 star restaurant

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SingleThread, an inn, farm and restaurant in Healdsburg, California, opened at the very end of 2016. I visited the restaurant four months after opening, and I have never had a more perfectly curated restaurant experience. I was in Napa for the Culinary Institute of America's annual World of Flavor conference (very likely the best food conference each year), and was lucky enough to secure a reservation. 

When I walked in, I was greeted by name and was invited to take a look into the kitchen before heading up to the roof for a drink. Chef Kyle Connaughton came over to the window to say hi and asked me how the conference was going. I asked him how he knew I was at the conference and he said, 'We know things." We both laughed and chatted about the conference. A lot of restaurants claim to do their homework on their guests, but SingleThread really does.

The next stop in the flawlessly curated evening was the roof top patio. I was greeted with a drink of purple sweet potato bush and oroblanco. It was tart and refreshing. It was a perfectly clear, blue, and warm Sonoma county day. After a few minutes, one of the servers brought over some snacks nestled amongst a plate of foliage. The four bites prepared me for the visual perfection, immensely fresh vegetables, and creativity of the meal to come. It was clear that the SingleThread farm was providing gorgeous produce for the restaurant.

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I was escorted into a stunning dining room where many of the tables faced the kitchen. The far wall of the kitchen is shelf after shelf of Japanese donabe cooking vessels, simple yet elegant. The table was already set with a bounty of foliage and hidden bites. My favorite items in this first barrage of delightful bites were malted potato with caramelized onions and turbot, creamy egg with caviar and spinach purée, and tuna loin cured with seaweed and flavored with with house-aged ponzu, and scallop crudo with shiso vinaigrette. 

Every one of the ten courses that came out after the initial offering were surprising in different ways. The trout cooked in a donabe was one of my favorites. It was served over a vinaigrette made with shio koji and topped with trout roe. Koji is the fungus used to make soy sauce, miso and sake, and shio koji is a salted liquid that is used as a marinade and sauce which contains enzymes that help break down proteins which releases free glutamate, the main source of umami. The trout itself was cooked flawlessly. It had the perfect doneness of fish cooked sous vide, but with a firm texture and a very slight smoky flavor. It was perfect, and nothing I've ever seen before. It was paired with a yellow tumeric and grenadine cocktail with smoked sea salt, which was a superb pairing. Another of my favorite dishes was foie gras with turnips, spinach and tomato tea made from dehydrated tomatoes from their farm. I have never had foie gras with turnips before, but I do hope to again.

I was driving back to St. Helena after dinner, so I opted for the non-alcoholic pairing. Non-alcoholic pairings are definitely a test of how seriously a restaurant takes its bar program. At Noma, their juice pairing was fascinating, full of non-alcoholic fermented vegetable and fruit juices. At Coi, the tea pairing was a first of its kind and I learned a lot that night. SingleThread was by far the best non-alcoholic pairing I've ever had. It is head and shoulders above any other in my experience. Every drink was unique, superbly paired, something I had never come across before, delicious, and in the most beautiful glassware from Japan. The glass maker is Kimura in Japan. 

As you can see, I was inordinately impressed by SingleThread. Some people may find the heavily Japanese inflected food a bit light or subtle, and I do think there is room to continue to improve the food. But let me be clear, that would mean taking a few things from very good to great, or great to amazing, as everything was at least very good. Considering that the restaurant has only been open for four months, they have achieved the nearly impossible. I predict that they will have 3 Michelin stars when the San Francisco Bay Area guide comes out in October. In all of my travels and all of my restaurant visits, I have never had such a perfectly choreographed evening. 

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Malabar in Lima, Peru: Food from the Amazon

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Malabar in Lima, Peru: Food from the Amazon

Lima is one of the best food cities in the world, and there's a delightful culinary surprise practically around every corner. But Malabar in Lima was the most exciting meal of my entire trip to Lima. Malabar has kept a position on the Latin America and World's Best Restaurants lists for many years now, and for good reason. Every menu item was full of ingredients and preparations I had never seen before. 

Chef Pedro Miguel Schiaffino is the owner of Malabar. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America and the Italian Culinary Institute for Foreigners, then spent five years cooking in Italy before moving back to his native Lima. He is one of a handful of world-renowned chefs in Lima who is highlighting local ingredients and techniques in his restaurants. 

There's nothing more exciting for a foodie than to find something new and incredibly tasty. When I sat down to dinner and the server brought me the bread course, I knew I would have my mind blown during this meal. I was treated to three breads made from yucca (cassava) that were completely new to me, along with a dipping sauce made from fermented yucca juice that was black and funky with an umami kick that the Japanese would envy. I was in awe of it. It was one of those moments when I thought, "Why doesn't the whole world eat like this?" After the bread came the most flavorful hearts of palm dish I've ever had, and and then raw scallops with cucumbers, native herbs and fermented ají amarillo. This native yellow pepper is ubiquitous in Peruvian cuisine, but this is the only time I have had it fermented. Every dish contained a delicious surprise. I only wish I could eat like this every day! 

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Smoked corn "noodles" recipe

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Smoked corn "noodles" recipe

For National Spaghetti Day we are sharing a modernist recipe that looks like spaghetti but doesn't actually contain any pasta! This smoked corn noodles dish has noodles made of smoked corn cob infused broth with a sauce of thickened Vietnamese-style nuoc cham, all topped with fried shallots, mint and hibiscus crystals. The noodles are made with a mixture of hydrocolloids, which provide a chewy, noodle-like texture (courtesy of Rich Rosendale).  And remember, the same three steps are almost always used with hydrocolloids: disperse, fully hydrate with heat, and cool.  The dish is smoky, savory, sweet and tart, in addition to being gluten free and pescatarian safe.   

Smoked Corn Noodles with Nuoc Cham

Nuoc cham:

  • Sugar - 60 g
  • Xanthan gum - 0.8 g
  • Fish sauce - 60 g
  • Rice vinegar - 30 g
  • Lime juice  - 30 g
  • Garlic, minced - 10 g
  • Bird’s-eye chili, minced - 1

Noodles:

  • Broth - 900 g of chicken or pork broth
  • Smoked corn cobs - 6 ears of corn smoked for 30 min to 1 hour (until corn kernels are cooked) at 135C (275F) 
  • Salt - to taste
  • Locust bean gum - 3 g  
  • Kappa carrageenan - 1 g
  • Iota carrageenan - 5 g
  • Calcium lactate - 0.5 g 
  • Mint leaves - 12 small leaves
  • Cilantro leaves - 12 small leaves
  • Fried shallots - 30 g
  • Hibiscus Flower Crystals from Fresh Origins - 10 g

Method:

  1. Mix sugar and xanthan gum together
  2. Mix all ingredients for nuoc chom together and sprinkle in sugar/xanthan gum mixture while whisking
  3. Whisk to dissolve sugar and xanthan gum for at least one minute to fully dissolve and then set aside
  4. After corn is removed from smoked corn ears (and kept to use for another purpose), steep corn cobs in broth for one hour at a low simmer
  5. Season the broth to taste, but be careful not to over salt because the nuoc cham will be salty
  6. Strain the broth
  7. In a blender, disperse (blend in slowly) the locust bean gum, kappa carrageenan, iota carrageenan and calcium lactate 
  8. While stirring constantly, heat mixture to 70C (158F)
  9. Pour mixture into a flat tray to set.  It should be no more than 1/4 inch deep.
  10. Let cool to solidify
  11. Cut smoked corn broth into 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick noodles
  12. Portion noodles and dress with nuoc cham to taste
  13. Top noodles with fried shallots, cilantro, mint, and Flower Crystals

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Mostly Ramen in Fukuoka, Japan

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Mostly Ramen in Fukuoka, Japan

Should you plan to visit Fukuoka for one day or seven?  It is a tough choice.  Fukuoka is a city in the southwest of Japan.  It has a population of about 1.5 million people and is the largest city on the southern island of Kyushu.  It is Japan’s fifth largest city, and probably the most manageable city in Japan that I’ve visited (Osaka, Kyoto and Tokyo being the others).  It was the seventh most livable city according to Monocle in 2016.  Not many people speak English and I only know a few words of Japanese, but after only a few days in Fukuoka I could easily manage the subway and the buses on my own.  I knew the major sections of the city and had found the 24 hour Ichiran, thankfully only a half mile from my hotel as I made many trips there.  Fukuoka is a city of food and shopping.  There is a park containing the ruins of the samurai compound, the ocean and associated fishing industry, and a few notable temples.  But it isn’t the wonderland of activities like the bigger Japanese cities.  There is no Disneyland, no Harry Potter Universal Studios, no giant robots walking the streets.  But there is ramen.  And that might just be enough for an entire week.

Fukuoka and Hakata are two cities that merged into one and the official name of the city is now Fukuoka, but Hakata is still often used to refer to the city and the main train station is called Hakata Station.  Hakata ramen is famous worldwide as rich, pork based tonkotsu ramen.  This is the type of ramen that is popping up on every other corner in major cities around the US and the world.  And this is may be the only type of ramen most people around the world have eaten.  In Japan there is ramen based on fish, miso, and chicken.  In most of the world there is only tonkotsu ramen.  It has taken over the world because it is so delicious.  

I managed to fit in eight bowls in three and a half days. They were all so good that it was on my last night in Fukuoka at the two Michelin star Tempura Tenko where I hit the wall, not any of the ramen joints.  It’s a good thing I walked ten miles a day while I was there.  

Ramen, in order of preference:

Ichiran - This is a global chain and for good reason.  At most locations you get your own small booth to slurp your noodles with only your ramen for company.  They make a pork broth, but it also has garlic, their special red spicy sauce, and I venture to say some other aromatics and something mildly acidic.  Every bowl is customized because you get to choose the intensity and richness of the broth, level of spice, amount of garlic, addition of green and/or white onions, addition of chashu (roasted pork), and firmness of the noodles.  The noodles in Fukuoka are a bit different than ramen noodles known to most people.  They are thin and straight.  And delicious.  Three of my eight bowls were from Ichiran, partly because I loved it and partly because the restaurant at their global headquarters is open 24 hours and I ate ramen for breakfast.  Most ramen joints do not open until 11 am and some stay open very late.  

Mengekijo Genei - Unlike many ramen restaurants where you are expected to file in, sit or stand at a crowded counter, eat quickly and get out, Mengekijo Genei is built like a stadium with the ramen chef on center stage so that everyone can watch the show.  We were early to avoid the crowd and got a front row seat.  The chef was incredibly friendly and came out to speak to us.  I was with a Japanese guide so was able to talk with him a bit and learn more about his ramen.  It is made with dried shrimp, scallops and abalone, and pork or course.  We tried their standard house ramen and a spicy version with minced pork topping.  Their house ramen was the best of the two.  It had the standard topics of chashu, mushrooms and green onions and nothing more was needed.  The noodles and broth were amazing and that’s all that really matters.  This broth was more complex than many of the others I had in Fukuoka and one of the best.

Hide-chan - Canal city is one of the shopping meccas in Fukuoka.  My dream food court is on the fifth floor and is called Ramen Stadium.  It is filled with the best ramen shops from the Fukuoka region.  My hotel was attached to this mall and it is the one and only reason I chose to stay there.  Hide-chan is very well known and has many locations world wide.  I ventured out a bit while there and chose their special fatty pork neck rather than the standard chashu.  The bowl was simple and contained only the pork, green onions and noodles.  The broth was on the complex side, which I found that I enjoy more than the simpler broths.  The pork neck was delicious and very tender.  It went perfectly with the broth.  All in all a great bowl of ramen, surrounded by seven other ramen restaurants plus Ichiran in the basement.  If only I'd been hungrier!  Heaven.  

Ganso Nagahama - This is a classic ramen shop near the fish market.  It opened right after the end of WWII and now has other branches in Fukuoka.  The original restaurant is very industrial and utilitarian.  The workers are dressed in white with rain boots.  Everything behind the counter is stainless steel and clearly built and organized for efficiency.  In the eating area there are large communal tables with stools.  There is a giant pot of warm tea on each table, a bucket of mugs, and a tub of red pickled ginger.  The ramen ticket machine outside has the fewest number of options I’ve seen.  You could choose to buy extra noodles or extra chashu and that was it.  It was also the cheapest bowl of ramen at only 500 yen (about $4.75).  This was a simple and straightforward bowl.  Noodles, paper thin chashu and a generous helping of green onions.  That’s it and really no other options.  The noodles were very good and cooked perfectly.  The broth was simple, but delicious.  I would guess that it was almost completely pork broth, but with a small bit of something else to give it slightly more complexity.   

Shin Shin - This is also a famous Hakata ramen mainstay with multiple locations.  This was my least favorite of the the five ramen restaurants I visited, but it was still very good.  Before I tried this ramen I didn’t fully understand what was meant when by a silky tonkotsu broth.  This broth had that heaviest mouthfeel of any ramen I’ve ever had.  I can imagine it will start to become a solid mass very quickly as it cools because of the amount of collagen in the broth.   The broth was meaty and full of pork flavor, but was the least complex of the five different places I tried.  It would probably be the best ramen in most cities in the world.  

Other notable Fukuoka finds:

Yatai - Fukuoka is about the only city in Japan with much of a street food culture.  Every night when the sun goes down, tiny, fully functional restaurants called yatai pop up on the street.  They serve ramen (of course!), matsunabe (organ soup), mentaiko (spicy cod roe), oden (boiled meat and vegetables), yakitori and sushi.  They are open until around 2am and are perfect for that last meal after a night of drinking with your friends.

Tempura Tenko - As mentioned above, this is a classic high end Japanese tempura restaurant.  The chef is a very experienced tempura master and provides instructions on how to eat each piece (tempura sauce, lemon, salt or curry salt).  It was the cheapest 2 star restaurant I have been to in quite a while ($150 total with sake).  It was a beautiful space and the chef and the hostess were very gracious.  We got by with my extremely limited Japanese and their slightly better English.  The chef had a list of the ingredients in English, so he would tell me in English or show me the sheet if he was unsure of the pronunciation.  As I mentioned above, after so many bowls of ramen and a meal of fried things, even if they were expertly done and very light, I hit the wall.  I could only take two bites of the last rice dish.  It was a very good experience overall.  I enjoyed the perfection of the restaurant.  The pottery was beautiful.  The restaurant was decorated sparingly and achieved that perfect simple beauty at which the Japanese excel.

Kira Hakata Steakhouse - Kira Hakata is a teppanyaki style steakhouse that is right on the bank of the river.  They serve Saga beef which is wagyu beef from the Saga region (like Kobe beef is wagyu beef from the Kobe region).  My own personal teppanyaki chef  started by cooking giant garlic chips in oil, then saved the oil to cook the subsequent steak, vegetables and fried rice.  The steak was so marbled it was half fat and half meat which makes for incredibly tender and meaty beef.  The chef cooked each bite individually.  The garlic fried rice was so well prepared that the garlic was not overwhelming and every component in the rice came together perfectly.  

Yakitori Masashi is the Japanese restaurant of my dreams.  Delicious salty grilled meats on skewers, sochu (sweet potato liquor), and fun.  The staff was incredibly welcoming to this foreigner.  They made sure I could properly say the name of each item before they served it to me, joked around with us, encouraged me to take all the pictures I wanted, and posed for every picture they caught me taking.  They even brought me a special dish of tiny taro like potatoes that had been grilled with oil and salt.  If I found a yakitori joint like this in the SF Bay Area, I would move next to it so that it could become my favorite neighborhood restaurant.  

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Maido in Lima, Peru: The best of Nikkei, the fusion of Peruvian and Japanese food

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Maido in Lima, Peru: The best of Nikkei, the fusion of Peruvian and Japanese food

Recommended: Strongly        

Type of Food: High end, Technique driven, Creative, Modernist, Local Ingredients

Maido is ranked 13 on the World's 50 Best Restaurants list and is ranked 5 on Latin America's 50 Best Restaurants list.  Maido was my favorite meal in Lima.  At it's heart, Peruvian food is a fusion cuisine based on all of the immigrants who have added their flavors to the indigenous culture including Japanese, Chinese, Italian, African and Spanish.  Nikkei is Japanese-Peruvian food.  When I first heard about Nikkei, I was skeptical.  When I tasted it, I was an immediate convert.  The great umami centered Japanese cuisine combined with Peruvian ingredients with it's acid and incredible fruit and vegetable diversity makes for one of the most flavorful and exciting cuisines in the world.  No doubt.  The vibe at Maido is relaxed, and it is large enough that there are a small number of walk ins available.  However, reservations are a must if you want the Amazon Nikkei Experience, which is their tasting menu.  I have heard that if you are not able to get a reservation for the Nikkei Experience, they may be able to provide a smaller tasting menu experience.  Mitsuharu Tsumura is the chef and owner of Maido.  He is a native of Lima and trained in Japan before opening Maido.  If you are in Lima, make sure to get a reservation at Maido for the Nikkei Experience.  

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Central in Lima, Peru: The best restaurant in a great food city

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Central in Lima, Peru: The best restaurant in a great food city

Recommended: Strongly        

Type of Food: High end, Technique driven, Creative, Modernist, Local Ingredients

Central is currently ranked #4 on the World's 50 Best Restaurant's List and #1 on the Latin America's 50 Best Restaurant's List.  They are known for venturing into the wilds of Peru to find native ingredients to highlight in the restaurant.  Peru is one of the world's most ecologically diverse countries containing peaks in the Andes that are over 20,000 feet high, jungles along the Amazon river, and a coastal desert where most of the population lives.  There are 4,000 varieties of potatoes, hundreds of varieties of chili peppers, and jungle fruit I had never seen before.  Central's mission is to highlight the amazing diversity and uniqueness of Peru's flora and fauna and they do it incredibly well.  The cost of the large 18 course tasting menu is 398 Peruvian Nuevos Soles which is about $120.  This is a lot of money in Peru, but much less than most world class restaurants cost.  Central succeeds in presenting a very refined version of incredible Peruvian cuisine.  

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